onceuponatown:

From “Chicago”, 1927.

//…Dennis Stock…//
Resting in a hippie commune in New Mexico, 1971.

In the latter half of the sixties, a generation with an energy and a vision appeared on the horizon – a dramatic force that brought the American conservative scene to a halt. The young decided to take destiny into their own hands, and shape a future of love and caring. Many groups formed communes throughout the nation.

//…Dennis Stock…//
Venice Beach Rock Festival. California, 1968.

This image is taken from Dennis Stock’s remarkable 99 black-and-white photographs, which are the result of the author’s travels through the unique state of California during the1960s. Traversing the state from Sacramento to San Diego, Stock says of this collection, “Even though I found the sun and fog, sand and Sierras which conveyed a firm image of stark reality, the mother vision of life, the state seemed unreal. The people were conducting layers and dimensions of life that unsettled me. Surrealism was everywhere, the juxtapositions of relative levels of reality projected chaos. For the young man with traditional concerns for a spiritual and aesthetic order, California seemed too unreal. I ran.” This classic photo essay on California captures the contrasts of the state and its people, from the mountains of the Sierras to the sands of the coast, from the people on a spiritual quest to those doing research at the cutting-edge of technology, all during time of intense political, cultural, and social exploration in America’s history.

daily quote

“The similarity between Van Gogh, Haiku poetry, and good photography is the concern for mortality. That things are very fleeting, that there are people who are more sensitive to death than others. The threat of time is of great concern to them. And the camera is a very appropriate instrument for many.”
– Dennis Stock

Frida Kahlo to Marty McConnell
by Marty McConnell

“leaving is not enough; you must
stay gone. train your heart
like a dog. change the locks
even on the house he’s never
visited. you lucky, lucky girl.
you have an apartment
just your size. a bathtub
full of tea. a heart the size
of Arizona, but not nearly
so arid. don’t wish away
your cracked past, your
crooked toes, your problems
are papier mache puppets
you made or bought because the vendor
at the market was so compelling you just
had to have them. you had to have him.
and you did. and now you pull down
the bridge between your houses,
you make him call before
he visits, you take a lover
for granted, you take
a lover who looks at you
like maybe you are magic. make
the first bottle you consume
in this place a relic. place it
on whatever altar you fashion
with a knife and five cranberries.
don’t lose too much weight.
stupid girls are always trying
to disappear as revenge. and you
are not stupid. you loved a man
with more hands than a parade
of beggars, and here you stand. heart
like a four-poster bed. heart like a canvas.
heart leaking something so strong
they can smell it in the street.”

McConnell is a contemporary poet who, in this work, imagines receiving relationship advice from the late Mexican artist Frida Kahlo, who, as we know, faced her own set of romantic upheavals—she counted Diego Rivera, Isamu Noguchi, and Josephine Baker among her lovers. But despite the specificity of its title, this poem could just as well have been written for any woman who has ever left a relationship behind in order to open herself up to better, truer possibilities. A good reminder to us all—whether we’re years beyond our last break-up, or still freshly reeling.
via: http://peelsofpoetry.tumblr.com/post/34524527364/frida-kahlo-to-marty-mcconnell-by-marty-mcconnell

…The love of her life…
Marina Abramovic meets Ulay

“Marina Abramovic and Ulay started an intense love story in the 70s,
performing art out of the van they lived in. When they felt the relationship
had run its course, they decided to walk the Great Wall of China,
each from one end, meeting for one last big hug in the middle
and never seeing each other again. at her 2010 MoMa retrospective
Marina performed ‘The Artist Is Present’ as part of the show,
a minute of silence with each stranger who sat in front of her.
Ulay arrived without her knowing it and this is what happened.”