//…Vivian Maier…//
#vivianmaier
If you don’t believe in fate and destiny, then you haven’t heard the story of Vivian Maier. The New York Times calls her “one of America’s more insightful street photographers,” but that could have all been different if one man, John Maloof, didn’t happen to discover Maier’s images.
Maier was born in New York in 1926, lived in France and then returned to New York in 1951 where she lived for five years. She wandered the streets and, mostly using her Rolleiflex twin-lens reflex camera, snapped pictures wherever she went. Later, Maier would move to Chicago to work as a nanny for forty years. Taking pictures into the late 1990s, Maier would leave behind a body of work comprising over 100,000 negatives. She did not share her pictures with others and many she never saw herself. In fact, she left behind hundreds of undeveloped rolls of film.
Enter John Maloof, a young eBay entrepreneur and real estate agent. In 2007, after acquiring a box full of Maier’s negatives for $400 at a local thrift auction house on Chicago’s Northwest Side almost by accident (he thought he was purchasing pictures of Chicago’s Portage Park neighborhood), the then 26-year-old would soon realize that he had stumbled upon something epic.
Now 50 years after Maier took her photos, her body of work has gone on to receive critical acclaim. Her vintage street scenes depicting life in Chicago and New York have received worldwide attention. The photos that were seemingly destined for obscurity, have been given a new lease on life.

Collected here are Maier’s photos that were all taken in New York during the 1950s. They’ll transport you back into another time and place while still making you feel connected to the subjects as a whole.
The book Vivian Maier: Street Photographer is scheduled to be released on November 17, 2011, and a feature-length documentary film about Maier and Maloof’s discovery of her work, titled Finding Vivian Maier, will debut in 2012. If you’d like to see Maier’s photos in person, there are two upcoming exhibitions you can mark on your calendar – Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York (December 15, 2011 – January 28, 2012) and Merry Karnowsky Gallery in Los Angeles (January 7 – January 28, 2012).

Vivian Maier’s website:
http://ift.tt/fsPo8I
……………………………………………………
via: Everyone’s Blog Posts – My Modern Metropolis http://ift.tt/1JJr2Gd

//…Vivian Maier…//
#vivianmaier
If you don’t believe in fate and destiny, then you haven’t heard the story of Vivian Maier. The New York Times calls her “one of America’s more insightful street photographers,” but that could have all been different if one man, John Maloof, didn’t happen to discover Maier’s images.
Maier was born in New York in 1926, lived in France and then returned to New York in 1951 where she lived for five years. She wandered the streets and, mostly using her Rolleiflex twin-lens reflex camera, snapped pictures wherever she went. Later, Maier would move to Chicago to work as a nanny for forty years. Taking pictures into the late 1990s, Maier would leave behind a body of work comprising over 100,000 negatives. She did not share her pictures with others and many she never saw herself. In fact, she left behind hundreds of undeveloped rolls of film.
Enter John Maloof, a young eBay entrepreneur and real estate agent. In 2007, after acquiring a box full of Maier’s negatives for $400 at a local thrift auction house on Chicago’s Northwest Side almost by accident (he thought he was purchasing pictures of Chicago’s Portage Park neighborhood), the then 26-year-old would soon realize that he had stumbled upon something epic.
Now 50 years after Maier took her photos, her body of work has gone on to receive critical acclaim. Her vintage street scenes depicting life in Chicago and New York have received worldwide attention. The photos that were seemingly destined for obscurity, have been given a new lease on life.

Collected here are Maier’s photos that were all taken in New York during the 1950s. They’ll transport you back into another time and place while still making you feel connected to the subjects as a whole.
The book Vivian Maier: Street Photographer is scheduled to be released on November 17, 2011, and a feature-length documentary film about Maier and Maloof’s discovery of her work, titled Finding Vivian Maier, will debut in 2012. If you’d like to see Maier’s photos in person, there are two upcoming exhibitions you can mark on your calendar – Howard Greenberg Gallery in New York (December 15, 2011 – January 28, 2012) and Merry Karnowsky Gallery in Los Angeles (January 7 – January 28, 2012).

Vivian Maier’s website:
http://buff.ly/1OjN1lH
……………………………………………………
via: Everyone’s Blog Posts – My Modern Metropolis http://ift.tt/2093IZE

//…Marianne Breslauer…//
#mariannebreslauer
Marianne Breslauer (married surname Feilchenfeldt, 20 November 1909 – 7 February 2001) was a German photographer during the Weimar Republic. Marianne was born in Berlin, the daughter of the architect Alfred Breslauer (1866–1954) and Dorothea Lessing (the daughter of art historian Julius Lessing). She took lessons in photography in Berlin from 1927 to 1929, and became an admirer firstly of the then well-known portrait photographer Frieda Riess and later of the Hungarian André Kertész, although she saw her future as a photographic reporter.
In 1929 she travelled to Paris, where she briefly became a pupil of Man Ray. A year later she started work for the Ullstein photo studio in Berlin, headed up by Elsbeth Heddenhausen, where she mastered the skills of developing photos in the dark-room. Until 1934 her photos were published in many leading magazines such as the Frankfurter Illustrierten, Der Querschnitt, Die Dame, Zürcher Illustrierten and Das Magazin.
Marianne was a close friend of the Swiss photographer Annemarie Schwarzenbach, whom she met through Ruth Landshoff and whom she photographed many times. She described Annemarie (who died at the young age of 34) as: “Neither a woman nor a man, but an angel, an archangel”. In 1933 they travelled together to the Pyrenees to carry out a photographic assignment for the Berlin photographic agency Academia. This led to Marianne’s confrontation with the anti-Semitic practices then coming into play in Germany. Her employers wanted her to publish her photos under a pseudonym, to hide the fact that she was Jewish. She refused to do so and left Germany. However her photo Schoolgirls won the “Photo of the Year” award at the “Salon international d’art photographique” in Paris in 1934.
She emigrated in 1936 to Amsterdam where she married the art dealer Walter Feilchenfeldt—he had previously left Germany after seeing Nazis break up an auction of modern art. Her first child, Walter, was born here. Family life and work as an art dealer hindered her work in photography, which she gave up to concentrate on her other activities. In 1939 the family fled to Zurich where her second son, Konrad, was born.
After the war, in 1948, the couple set up an art business specializing in French paintings and 19th-century art. When her husband died in 1953 she took over the business, which she ran with her son Walter from 1966 to 1990. She died in Zollikon, near Zurich.
via: wikipedia http://ift.tt/1PlrJWx